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Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
 
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  Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

7. THE RELEASE


 
 
 

Last Crusade retains the "thrill- a-second" pace of the previous films, but this one has far more heart. Although the movie abounds with the technology of the era it potrays, the technology never overshadows the characters. The script allows Ford and Connery to define what cinematic chemistry is all about. The action sequences are woven into the story to allow Indy and his dad to demonstrate their own types of resourcefulness: Indy with the strength and force, his father with ingenuity and wit. The humor is omnipresent and often hilarious. The incredible ending manages to blend mysticism, religion, and spectacular action far more successfully than the conclusions of the first two films.


7.1 BOX OFFICE HIT


Last Crusade opened on Memorial Day weekend 1989 in 2327 theaters across the US and Canada. The $36 million epic immediately set two then-box-office records: collecting the most receipts ever in one day ($10 million) and having the biggest opening week in film history (a total gross of $50 million). Critics were unstinting in their praise, thus forgiving Spielberg for the somber tone of Temple. Virtually every reviewer cited the casting coup of a Harrison Ford-Sean Connery teamup. Last Crusade, along with Batman and Lethal Weapon 2, dominated the sumer box office and made short work of the competition, which included such high-profile sequels as The Karate Kid Part 2, Ghostbusters 2, and Star Trek 5. Ironically, one of the films "victimized" by Last Crusade's staying power was he 007 thriller Licence to Kill.

In England, where the film was premiered on June 27 and attended by the Prince of Wales, Last Crusade grossed 15.923.000 pounds.

In France, Indy met a real apotheosis. Within two and a half weeks from its release, Last Crusade broke the one million tickets barrier in Paris establishing an absolute record. Four million French run to 310 theaters in France for their rendezvous with their favorite archaeologist. In the long run the Last Crusade made a gross of 6.248.000 tickets.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade entered the top-10 of box-office champions with a worldwide gross of $494.8 million.

There were people who at the time of the new film's release accused Lucas and Spielberg for making another Indy film. George Lucas had just got divorced from his wife Marcia and he had given all his money in order to retain the control of his companies. Spielberg on the other hand hadn't direct anything successful since Temple of Doom while his serious attempts towards a mature audience with films like The Color Purple and Empire of the Sun got unnoticed and criticized by the critics with less than kind remarks. The word was that they both needed a success soon, in order to maintain their status in the film business but poisonous remarks like these never bothered the two filmmakers much.

Proud for his work Spielberg stated that he made the film as an apology for Indy II, "I wanted to make a movie I could stand naked on top of."


7.2 LAST CRUSADE ???


 
 
 

The final shot of the Last Crusade with the four intrepid adventurers literally riding off into the sunset, towards new adventures, was one of the many hints revealing Spielberg's intentions on the continuation of the Indiana Jones saga. "I built every clue into this movie I possible could think of to let George know that we should retire this guy's number. I did all I could. But at the moment I think I'd like to quit. At this point we all feel pretty much have a nice first, second and third act. Why go and create a forth act? We don't need one."

When talked to journalist Phil Brown Spielberg was very clear about his intentions of making another Indy film, "I don't control the destiny of the Indiana Jones movies. George can make as many as he like but it's certainly my graduation gift to be able to work on something like this in the best way possible, say goodbye to all my old friends and move on." Tough he agreed that his decision was not one without regrets. "I'm really going to miss working with Harrison as Indy. I look forward to working with him in other sorts of roles, but I'll really miss sitting with him in that hat and that jacket with all the sweat and the dirty khaki shirt and the boots and the whip and the pouch and the sidearm and the five-day stubble and most of all, I'll miss his sense of humor. Working with Harrison as Indy was kind of like working with Fred C. Dobbs from The Treasure of the Sierra Madre for eight years and I'm going to miss that very much."

Spielberg wasn't the only one stating that he wanted to move on, as George Lucas, too, found the prospect of another film unlikely. "I don't foresee there being another one. Anything is possible, but I've run out of ideas. I've had a great time making the Indiana Jones films, but now it's time to move on. I would just as soon do other things," said Indy's creator.

Robert Watts, being more conciliatory than the two filmmakers went on to say that, "It was always envisioned as three movies, this is the third and it's called The Last Crusade. Sean Connery was never going to make another Bond film, but he did. I couldn't tell you, to be honest whether there will be another one. I don't know. um it's possible. but I suspect it would never be quite the same team again, but I couldn't tell. I think the formula has been very successful and I think the movies are great fun. I personally would love to see another one get made, but ultimately it's not my decision, so. all I can say is, 'Wait and see!'"

"Indy doesn't die at the end," was Boam's observation. "His father doesn't die. Sallah and Brody don't die. Nobody dies. We haven't burned any bridges. We all know how this business works, and that never doesn't necessarily mean never." John Rhys-Davies shared the same thoughts that Boam had about the continuation of the saga, "In the film business the door is always open just a crack. Harrison is more of a mainline leading man these days and I'm not sure that he really wants to do any more Indiana Jones films. And this isn't really the sort of films Steven wants to direct. I think he's more into areas of the human heart than action and adventure. But you never know."

Ford saw Last Crusade as his last appearance as Indiana Jones. He reflected on the role with some sentiment:"I'll miss the whole thing. There is a lot of pleasure in this character for me. I enjoy the kind of humor that we have in these films and I love doing the physical stuff. It makes me feel like a kid. I'll miss the particular fun of playing the character but I think three films is enough." When asked about any possibility of continuing the role in the future, Ford responded, "I'll be in my fifties pretending to be thirty-five, and I'm afraid it's going to get to a point where it's too hard to get out of bed in the morning! I just won't be able to do the things I used to do." However he did add.

"Nobody has proposed doing any more of them. We all have other ambitions, other projects. It took us a long time to find a script we were happy with for this one. Since we are locked in a timeframe, which demands I don't get any older, we can't take forever to settle on another script, either. It's been eight years since the first picture, I believe. It would be another four or five years before we have a script and I'd be in my fifties. It might be unseemly." But even for smoothie Ford, who doesn't want to admit this is his favorite role, the idea of another one wasn't completely out of question. In an interview he gave to MTV's The Big Picture show he seemed more conciliatory and said, "I don't think we've run Indiana Jones into the ground. He's a romantic, but he's also a cynic. The interplay between the two extremes is what interests me so much. And it's his bravery, indomitability, and selflessness that make him irresistible to audiences. And for what it's worth, we simply haven't exhausted all the dangerous situations he can get into. If there is something I learned from Sean is to never say never!"


8. REVIEWS


"More cerebral than the first two Indiana Jones films, and less schmaltzy than the second, this literate adventure should entertain and enlighten kids and adults alike. The Harrison Ford - Sean Connery father-and-son team gives LAst Crusade unexpected emotional depth, reminding us that real film magic is not in special-effects."

- Variety

"Take a good look at this movie. In fact, go back four or five times and take four or five good looks. In this imperfect world, you're not likely to see many manmade objects come this close to perfection."

- Ralph Novak, People

"No, it's not as fesh and exhilarating as Raiders, but how could it be? Here's an antidote who sensed sequel sluggishness in Temple of Doom... One of the best ideas in this second sequel was recruiting Sean Connery. Connery and Ford are a testy father-son duo sharing quips, imminent danger, and even the favors of a gorgeous Nazi... Last Crusade is an adult comic strip, hyperkinetic high adventure that scarcely pauses for breath... Grab a crash helmet and go."

- Bruce Williamson, Playboy

"Though it cannot regain the brash originally of Raiders, in its own way, Last Crusade is nearly as good, matching its audience's wildest hopes."

- Caryn James, New York Times

"This thrice-told tale gives you your money's worth. Now, it's time to hang up the bullwhip and move on."

- David Ansen, Newsweek


9. SOURCES


- INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE PRODUCTION INFORMATION
- The Films of Harrison Ford by Lee Pfeifer & Michael Lewis
- From Star Wars to Indiana Jones
- The Raider.net


For more photos about the production visit the single sections.

- Movie pictures
- Production pictures
- Props and Modells
- Storyboards
- Drawings


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Today 12. December 2017
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